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Frank Zappa Documentary
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Mystery Jets To Play Socially Distanced Benefit Gig For Beirut

The show will raise money for the victims of the huge warehouse explosion which rocked the Lebanese capital in August, claiming the lives of over 200 people.

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Photo: Burak Cingi/Redferns

Mystery Jets and Graham Coxon have been announced on the line-up for a socially distanced benefit gig for Beirut at London’s Jazz Cafe next month.

The artists will play at ‘Live For Beirut 2.0’ on December 11, which is set to raise money for the victims of the huge warehouse explosion which rocked the Lebanese capital in August, claiming the lives of over 200 people.

Other acts on next month’s bill include the likes of Nadine Shah and Django Django, who will both play DJ sets, and performances from Elinor Rose Dougall and Bessie Turner. Tickets will go on sale from 10AM tomorrow (November 19), starting at £40 per person.

The news of Mystery Jets’ Beirut benefit comes after the Camden Town venue reopened as a fully seated venue in September, with the layout reflecting an original design concept for the venue when it opened in 1990.

The Jazz Cafe’s first gig since March came with The Sierra Band presenting ‘A Night of Southern Soul’ on September 18, while afrobeat veteran Dele Sosimi performed on the following evening.

On the reopening, head booker Ruari Frew said: “We’re still a long way off where we need to be, and it will be very difficult to operate financially but we owe it to all the people who make the live industry tick to give this a go.”

“Our world is largely made up of freelancers, many of whom fell through the gaps of any government support. It’s crucial that we get as many people as possible working again in a safe environment. Although it’s not sustainable in the medium or long term, for now it’s exciting to have musicians on stage in front of an audience, engineers in booths and bar staff serving drinks again.”

Mystery Jets released their acclaimed sixth album A Billion Heartbeats in May. In a four-star review, NME wrote: “With protest songs and celebrations of the NHS all part of their new identity, it’s a wildly successful take on the world at large as the band enter a new decade. Far from just indie survivors, it seems like these Jets have still got plenty of fuel left in the tank.”

Click here to listen to the best of Mystery Jets.

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