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Frank Zappa Documentary
Frank Zappa Documentary
Frank Zappa Documentary

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Barry Gibb Curates Digital ‘How Can You Mend A Broken Heart’ Collection

Across 25 tracks, it sets the scene for the first film of its kind about the global hitmakers, which is released on December 3.

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How Can You Mend A Broken Heart OST

Barry Gibb has curated a new digital collection of songs featured in the soundtrack of the forthcoming Bee Gees documentary How Can You Mend A Broken Heart. Across 25 tracks, it sets the scene for the first film of its kind about the global hitmakers, which is released on December 3.

The collection features many of the classic mega-hits forever associated with the Gibb brothers, but it also reaches into lesser-explored areas of their story. It begins in the Saturday Night Fever era with “Stayin’ Alive” before the appearance of the song which lends its title to the film, and which was a US No.1 for the Bee Gees in 1971 before it was famously covered by Al Green.

Listen to the How Can You Mend A Broken Heart digital collection right now.

From the group’s early rise to prominence in their adopted home of Australia, there’s the 1966 single “Spicks and Specks” and then a sequence of the releases that made them household names all over the world. Their first international hit “New York Mining Disaster 1941” is followed by “To Love Somebody,” “I Started A Joke,” “Massachusetts,” and “I’ve Gotta Get A Message To You.”

One of the lesser-known selections is “Wind of Change,” a non-single written by Barry and Robin Gibb from the staging post 1975 album Main Course. The three major singles from that set, “Jive Talkin’,” “Nights On Broadway,” and “Fanny (Be Tender With My Love),” are also included, along with three songs from the group’s next LP, 1976’s Children of the World: the disco anthem “You Should Be Dancing,” the hit ballad “Love So Right,” and the harmony-laden title track.

Three further anthems from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack follow in “Night Fever,” “More Than A Woman,” and “How Deep Is Your Love.” There’s the trio of big singles that were taken from 1979’s Spirits Having Flown, in “Tragedy,” “Too Much Heaven,” and the title song. “For Whom The Bell Tolls” represents the group’s later years of success, from 1993’s Size Isn’t Everything, before a move back to their earlier era for “Holiday,” “Run To Me,” and “Words.”

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