Lorde Releases Tropical-Inspired Video For ‘Fallen Fruit’

In the video, Lorde walks through lush forest landscapes and pristine beaches, often staring directly into the camera with an unflinching gaze.

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Lorde - Photo: Jamie McCarthy/MG21/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue
Lorde - Photo: Jamie McCarthy/MG21/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue

Lorde has unveiled a video for her latest hit single, “Fallen Fruit,” taken from her critically and commercially acclaimed new album, Solar Power.

In the video, Lorde walks through lush forest landscapes and pristine beaches, often staring directly into the camera with an unflinching gaze. The visual ends with Lorde getting into a car after dark, seemingly contemplating the various scenes she previously encountered.

Last month, the latest episode of M Means Music, the music podcast hosted by veteran UK music writer, DJ, and music consultant Daryl Easlea, dove into Lorde’s seminal debut album Pure Heroine.

The podcast, which combines music and spoken content as part of Spotify’s Music + Talk platform, spans the depth of Lorde’s first career-shifting album across 37 minutes. The episode highlights the major hit singles of Pure Heroine, such as “Teams,” “Royals” and “Tennis Court,” as well as fan favorites and deep cuts like “Ribs” and “Buzzcut Season.”

The month prior, Lorde released a digital EP featuring five Solar Power tracks recorded in te reo Māori, the language of the indigenous people of her native New Zealand. The surprise project arrived during Te Wiki o Te Reo, a week that celebrates the Māori language.

The Te Ao Mārama EP boasts renditions of “Solar Power,” “Stoned at the Nail Salon,” “Oceanic Feeling,” and others. According to Rolling Stone, while Lorde does not speak te reo Māori, she worked with three translators — including Hana Mereraiha, who translated three of the songs — to recreate each track’s lyrics.

In a newsletter to fans, Lorde wrote of the EP (via Stereogum), “Many things revealed themselves slowly to me while I was making this album, but the main realization by far was that much of my value system around caring for and listening to the natural world comes from traditional Māori principles. There’s a word for it in te reo: kaitiakitanga, meaning ‘guardianship or caregiving for the sky, sea, and land.’”

Lorde continued, “I’m not Māori, but all New Zealanders grow up with elements of this worldview. Te ao Māori and tikanga Māori are a big part of why people who aren’t from here intuit our country to be kind of ‘magical,’ I think. I know I’m someone who represents New Zealand globally in a way, and in making an album about where I’m from, it was important to me to be able to say: this makes us who we are down here. It’s also just a crazy beautiful language — I loved singing in it. Even if you don’t understand te reo, I think you’ll get a kick out of how elegant my words sound in it.”

Buy or stream Te Ao Mārama.

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