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Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones Go Live In 1969

Recorded on November 27 and 28, 1969, The Rolling Stones’ ‘Get Your Yas Yas Out’ was the first live album to reach No.1 on UK charts in September.

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The Rolling Stones In Concert - Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!

The Rolling Stones’ tour of North America in late 1969 was their first since the summer of 1966 and it was their first anywhere since the Spring of 1967. They had of course played the huge free concert in London’s Hyde Park in July 1969, shortly after Brian Jones’ tragic death, but they were not the road-honed outfit that they had become in the heady days between 1963 to 1967.

Their tour began on 7 November at Fort Collins, Colorado, where they played the State University. Tickets for this 17-date, 23-show tour sold out in hours, and so great was the demand that extra concerts were added in New York and Los Angeles; they ended up playing to over 335,000 fans on the tour. The Stones started out by rehearsing in Stephen Stills’ basement before moving to a Warner Bros Studios soundstage.

They flew between most gigs, while basing themselves in Los Angeles and New York for some of the tour. They also quite often went on stage late – sometimes very late. On 8 November in Inglewood, California, they didn’t get start their second show until 4am Robert Hilburn, writing in the Los Angeles Times asked, “The Stones have succeeded in turning outrage into art. Are they really able to use all that money?”

Glyn Johns recorded their shows at Baltimore’s Civic Center on 26 November, and at Madison Square Garden, in New York City, on 27 and 28 November. The band decided to call their second live album, Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! and released it in September 1970.

Originally it was to be a double-album, including tracks by BB King and Ike and Tina Turner. But, as Mick said at the time “Decca weren’t interested. ‘Who is BB King? Who are these people?’ they asked. They just didn’t know who these acts were! So in the end I gave it all up ’cause it just wasn’t worth carrying on with.” For the 40th-anniversary release of the record, their guests’ tracks were included along with some additional bonus cuts from the Stones.

Jimi Hendrix visited the Stones before their show at Madison Square Garden and later watched the band on stage from behind Keith’s speaker stack; it was also Jimi’s 27th birthday. “I think I bust a button on my trousers, hope they don’t fall down… you don’t want my trousers to fall down do ya?” said Mick before the band eased themselves into Chuck Berry’s riffing rhythm. It had been six years since they first learned ‘Carol’ at a rehearsal at Studio 51 in Soho. They included it on their first album, but it never sounded better than it did live on stage in 1969.

On 27 November, at Madison Square Gardens, Disc and Music Echo reported, “Just as Ike and Tina finished their set, Janis Joplin came onstage and she and Tina sang together. Incredibly exciting, even if Janis’ key wasn’t the same one the band was playing.” The Stones themselves weren’t happy and told her that she’d better not do it again, otherwise they would leave the stage.

For the live recording they used The Wally Heider Mobile, and remixing and overdubs were done at Olympic Sound and Trident Studios in London, between January and April 1970. Its tongue-in-cheek cover photo of Charlie Watts was shot by David Bailey, while the album sleeve features the brilliant photography of Ethan Russell.

The record the British album chart in mid-September 1970 and eventually climbed to No.1, where it spent two weeks on top. In America it could only make No.6 after entering the charts in mid-October, having been released later in the US.

In the US, the Tribune asked, “In a hundred years’ time, when researchers start examining the pop phenomenon, I wonder if they will understand why The Rolling Stones were a legend in their own time?” One listen to this album and anyone should understand why. It is one of the quintessential rock albums of all time.

But where did the Stones get the unusual title for this record? Blind Boy Fuller, whose real name was Fulton Allen, was born in North Carolina in 1908 – he was a blues singer. He was not blind as a child or teenager, but became partially blind in 1926, and fully blind when he was 20.

He first recorded in July 1935, and shortly afterwards he spent a short time in prison for shooting his wife in the leg! He recorded a song called ‘Get Your Yas Yas Out’ on 29 October 1938, in Columbia, South Carolina. Fuller died, aged 32 in 1941.

Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! can be bought here.

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Steve G.

    November 28, 2014 at 5:04 am

    The greatest Rock & Roll band in the world.

    • Stickity Mick

      November 27, 2015 at 9:02 pm

      we’ve been a lot of places in America and now we’re in New York………

  2. Tim Thornton

    September 19, 2016 at 7:04 pm

    It was such a tremendous album, it’s easy to forget it was part of the tour that ended in tragedy at Altamont.

  3. Bijaya Pradhan

    November 27, 2016 at 2:45 pm

    The Stones best live recordings ever recorded. The song Jumping Jack Flash, Sympathy For The Devil, Oh Carol, Midnight Rambler are the best ones in this album. Mick Taylor did a good guitar works in this album.

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