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Expanded Edition Of OMD Biography ‘Pretending To See The Future’ Out Now

The new, soft back edition has a bonus extras section which contains an additional 100 stories from OMD fans not included in the hardback version.

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Expanded Edition OMD Biography
Photo: OMD Archive

A newly-expanded, soft back edition of Richard Houghton’s OMD biography, Pretending To See The Future is now available in both physical and digital formats. This new edition has a bonus extras section which contains an additional 100 stories from OMD fans not included in the hardback version.

First published by This Day In Music books on 13 December, 2018, and told in the first person, Pretending To See The Future is an oral history of OMD, mixing hundreds of fan anecdotes with memories from the band, their collaborators, other musicians and celebrity admirers garnered from 40 years of recording and performing.

The book contains commentary from OMD founders Andy McCluskey and Paul Humphreys, plus band members Martin Cooper, Malcolm Holmes and Stuart Kershaw, and is packed full of memorabilia and hundreds of photos. With many images in full colour and previously unseen pictures from the band’s own archive, this is the OMD story as it’s never been told before.

This new OMD biography includes contributions from Professor Brian Cox (who has written the foreword), Gary Numan, The Human League’s Phil Oakey, New Order’s Stephen Morris, Jeremy Vine, Steve Lamacq, Richard Blade, Adam Clayton, Howard Jones, Factory Records’ in-house designer Peter Saville, Kraftwerk’s Karl Bartos, John Dowie and Erasure’s Vince Clarke.

Pretending To See The Future is the first official OMD biography since 1987’s Messages. Taking the reader on a journey from their Merseyside beginnings via debut single `Electricity’ (released on Manchester’s iconic Factory label) into the 1980s and a string of Top 40 hits that includes `Enola Gay’, `Souvenir’, `Joan of Arc’, `Locomotion’, ‘Genetic Engineering’, ‘Tesla Girls’, ‘Message’ and US smash `If You Leave’. In its later chapters, Pretending To See The Future also covers the band’s break up in the 1990s and their triumphant return in 2006.

Pretending To See The Future is out now and can be bought here.

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