The Clash Listen

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When it comes to exuding timeless rock’n’roll cool, few bands will ever match The Clash. Fiery, politicised and utterly mandatory, the West London quartet were often dubbed “The Only Band That Matters”, and though they eventually split in some disarray in 1985, their invigorating catalogue has continued to inspire new generations of fans. Ironically, though, while The Clash (and their punk peers Sex Pistols) are now revered rock icons, they initially set out to destroy rock: albeit what they saw as the bloated, prog-dominated version of what passed for the mainstream rock’n’roll scene during the mid-70s. Rockabilly-loving frontman Joe Strummer’s rudimentary guitar style had already earned him his chosen nom de guerre while he was busking on the London Underground. Born John Graham Mellor, he was the son of a Foreign Office diplomat, but from 1974 he’d been eking out a living in a variety of London squats and fronting hotly-tipped London R&B outfit The 101’ers. However, when the already controversial Sex Pistols supported The 101’ers at a show at The Nashville Club in Kensington, in April ’76, Strummer immediately felt the wind of change. As he later recalled in the acclaimed, Don Letts-directed Clash documentary Westway To The World: “after just five seconds [of the Pistols’ set], I knew we were yesterday’s papers”.
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uDiscover Music transparent Essential Albums
The Clash

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Give 'Em Enough Rope

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London Calling

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Sandinista!

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Combat Rock

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