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Jeff Goldblum And The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra Visit ‘Winter Wonderland’

The track comes on the heels of Goldblum’s second No. 1 album in the jazz charts, ‘I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This,’ released on 1 November to widespread acclaim.

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Jeff Goldblum Winter Wonderland

Jeff Goldblum and his longtime band the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra are to release their first Christmas single. It’s their version of the holiday staple ‘Winter Wonderland,’ to be released by Decca Records on 29 November.

The track comes on the heels of Goldblum’s second No. 1 album in the jazz charts, I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This, which was released on 1 November to widespread acclaim. It swiftly followed his November 2018 set, The Capitol Studios Sessions.

The pianist-actor continues to thrill audiences with his music, playing for the Royal Family as part of the Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall on 9 November. In the summer, he played the West Holts Stage at Glastonbury Festival, winning a four-star review from The Guardian, who wrote of his “almost mythically winning charisma.”

Earlier this week, Goldblum and his orchestra performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, delivering a laid-back version of ‘Let’s Face The Music And Dance’ with guest vocalist Sharon Van Etten. Also in New York, they played at Sony Hall on 12 November.

Goldblum’s cool keyboards and the group’s laid-back groove make for a lively reinvention of ‘Winter Wonderland,’ the pre-World War II composition which continues to delight modern audiences. The song was written in 1934 with music by Felix Bernard and lyricist Richard B. Smith. It was popularised that year by Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians, who like Goldblum recorded for Decca.

The song also made Billboard’s pre-pop era music popularity charts for Ted Weems in 1935 and, soon after the war, for Perry Como, the Andrews Sisters and Johnny Mercer in 1946 and 1947. It has gone to be recorded hundreds upon hundreds of times, with a UK hit version in 1958 for Johnny Mathis and the version that has remained a favourite for generations by Darlene Love, from Phil Spector’s 1963 collection A Christmas Gift For You.

I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This by Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra is out now, and can be bought here.

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