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The Who’s Lesser-Known UK No. 1

The story of ‘Ready Steady Who,’ the chart-topping release in the band’s 1960s history that some of their latter-day fans might not know about.

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Who EP Ready Steady Who

It’s well known that one of the few achievements missing from the epic career of The Who is a UK No. 1 single. But there is a chart-topping release in their history that some of their latter-day fans might not know about. On 17 December 1966, the band climbed to the top of the EP chart in their home country with the five-track Ready Steady Who disc.

Ready Steady Who back cover

Released in November, the EP was a forerunner of their second album A Quick One and the new single ‘Happy Jack,’ which came out at the same time as that LP, but wasn’t included on it. Ready Steady Who was issued by Reaction Records to maximize the publicity from The Who’s recent appearance on their own special edition of the hit pop TV series Ready Steady Go! The EP didn’t actually feature those performances, but studio re-recordings done soon afterwards.

EP releases often gave bands the chance to experiment and have fun, beyond the discipline of their singles and album commitments, and that was certainly the case on a record that had The Who remaking a TV theme and even covering the Beach Boys.

The A-side featured two new Pete Townshend songs, ‘Disguises’ and ‘Circles,’ while the flip had the band covering Neal Hefti’s theme tune from the popular American Batman series of the time. They also did Jan & Dean’s ‘Bucket T’ and ‘Barbara Ann,’ the latter first done by the Regents but known to The Who and to their British fans in its version by the Beach Boys.

The disc entered the EP charts — a top ten list — at No. 7 at the end of November, ironically when the Beach Boys were not only at No. 1 with Hits, but also No. 3 with God Only Knows. The Who release climbed to No. 3, then 2, and made the top 49 years ago today, on a chart with some other interesting releases.

They included country legend Jim Reeves’ posthumous A Christmas Card From Jim, novelty act the Singing Postman’s First Delivery and British instrumental greats the Shadows’ Thunderbirds Are Go. That EP was inspired by the appearance of the marionette versions of the group in the feature film version of Gerry Anderson’s puppet adventure series Thunderbirds. The Shadows as puppets and The Who doing Batman: anything went on the UK pop scene of 1966.

Four of the five songs from the deleted Ready Steady Who EP are on the remastered version of A Quick One, which can be bought here.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Richard Evans

    December 19, 2016 at 11:00 am

    The Ready Steady Who! EP isn’t deleted. It is available in the Reaction Singles 1966 box which was released by Universal in 2015 on glorious vinyl.

    ‘Circles’ was not a new song. It had first appeared as a b-side of ‘Substitute’ in March 1966, eight months earlier.

  2. Kev Davies

    December 25, 2016 at 4:16 pm

    Circles was earmarked to be the follow up single to My Generation in early 1966 but due to the legal issues with Brunswick, Shel Talmy and their move to Robert Stigwoods Reaction lable they couldn’t put it out. They tried to use it as the B side to Substitute but that was soon stopped after the first pressings went out. It was then rerecorded and renamed Instant Party and again released as the Substitute B side but again Talmy stopped it. Substitute was then released with Waltz for a pig as the B side made number 5 on the UK singles charts. I had all three copies.

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