(function(h,o,t,j,a,r){ h.hj=h.hj||function(){(h.hj.q=h.hj.q||[]).push(arguments)}; h._hjSettings={hjid:104204,hjsv:5}; a=o.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; r=o.createElement('script');r.async=1; r.src=t+h._hjSettings.hjid+j+h._hjSettings.hjsv; a.appendChild(r); })(window,document,'//static.hotjar.com/c/hotjar-','.js?sv=');

News

Watch Margo Price Go Poolside With ‘Letting Me Down’ On ‘Jimmy Kimmel’

Price filmed a version of the track from her new album with her socially-distanced band on a torchlit patio around the pool.

Published on

uDiscover Music image background
Margo Price Getty Images credit Ilya S. Savenok
Photo: Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images

Margo Price marked last week’s release of her third album That’s How Rumors Get Started with a classy performance on Monday’s (13) Jimmy Kimmel Live, guest hosted by Iliza Shlesinger.

The Americana pacesetter, determined to stand out from the usual run of at-home performances, filmed a version of the album’s “Letting Me Down” with her socially-distanced band on a torchlit patio around the pool.

The clip complements the official video for the song, released last month with direction and production design by Kimberly Stuckwisch and featuring Price appearing in numerous guises around a house. For that video, Price noted that distancing requirements were successfully adhered to. “We bought a cheap ’80s travel trailer with a bathroom, kitchen, and a propane powered refrigerator,” she said, “so we wouldn’t have to go inside anywhere for food or bathrooms.”

“Curve of the earth beyond the Tennessee hills”

Reviewing That’s How Rumors Get Started for The Guardian, Kitty Empire wrote that it “is a record schooled in country, but keen to see the curve of the earth beyond the Tennessee hills. Price’s ear is cocked to the west: specifically to Los Angeles, where Rumours by Fleetwood Mac still echoes; the gimlet-eyed Americana of Tom Petty and his Heartbreakers figure too.”

Joe Breen, in the Irish Times, added: “The songs are also no longer firmly rooted in one sound, flipping from the mid-paced title track with echoes of Fleetwood Mac to the closing clutter of the melodramatic ‘I’d Die for You.’”

Oliver Kuscher, in The Line of Best Fit, commented that Price’s “first two albums stuck closely to the country music blueprint, with an edgy twist here and a delightful flourish there, but this time around, Price has aimed to tear that blueprint up completely.

“And what better way to do that than calling on friend and fellow country bard Sturgill Simpson to produce your record, whose album last year, Sound & Fury, was a complete and totally electric departure from the country western sound.”

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Don't Miss