So Many Places: The Life Of Leon Russell

November 13, 2017

Leon Russell, the Grammy Award winner and member of the Roll and Roll Hall of Fame, left us on 13 November 2016 at the age of 74. But as we were reminded by his joyful, posthumously-released 2017 album On A Distant Shore, his musical legacy will be enjoyed forever.

Born Claude Russell Bridges, he changed his name to Leon Russell when he moved to Los Angeles from his home in Tulsa, Oklahoma. His 60-year career embraced spells as a celebrated session musician and included writing some of rock’s most memorable songs, such as ‘A Song for You' and ‘Delta Lady.’ Those that Leon worked with included George Harrison, Elton John, Joe Cocker, John Lennon, Bob Dylan and Ringo Starr.

Russell moved to Los Angeles in 1958, where he worked on sessions for the Byrds, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, Bobby "Boris" Pickett and Herb Alpert; he appeared at 1964's T.A.M.I. Show, playing piano with the top-drawer session musicians known as the Wrecking Crew. He wrote two hits for Gary Lewis and Playboys and by 1967 he appeared on the Glen Campbell album, Gentle on My Mind, credited by his birth name, Russell Bridges.

Look Inside the Asylum Choir, a 1968 album, was a recording of a studio group including Russell and Marc Benno. The following year, Russell became a member of Delaney & Bonnie and Friends, playing guitar and keyboards on their albums and as a member of their touring band that included Eric Clapton and George Harrison.

Russell found further success as a songwriter with 'Delta Lady,' recorded by Cocker for for his 1969 album, Joe Cocker! The album, co-produced by Russell, made No.11 on the Billboard chart. This led to Russell joining 1970's Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour featuring many alumni from the Delaney and Bonnie band. 'Superstar,' co-written by Russell with Bonnie Bramlett and sung by Rita Coolidge on that tour, later became a hit for the Carpenters, Luther Vandross and many others.

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Shelter Records released his 1970 solo album, Leon Russell, which included the first recording of 'A Song for You'. This has been endlessly recorded by countless performers from Ray Charles to Willie Nelson as well as Amy Winehouse, Donny Hathaway, Simply Red and Michael Bublé. It was also in 1970 that Russell played piano on Dave Mason's album, Alone Together.

In 1971 Russell produced some tracks for Dylan, including the single 'Watching the River Flow' and 'When I Paint My Masterpiece,' both of which feature Leon's gospel-flavoured piano. Later that year he played piano on Badfinger's third album, Straight Up; his keyboard playing also complements Pete Ham and George Harrison's slide guitars on the group's hit 'Day After Day.' It was at this time that Russell appeared on Harrison's Concert for Bangladesh, at which he performed a medley including 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' and 'Young Blood' and sang a verse on Harrison's 'Beware of Darkness.'

Also in 1971 Russell released Leon Russell and the Shelter People and Asylum Choir II and played on sessions for B.B. King and for Clapton. He also helped blues guitarist Freddie King by collaborating with him on three of his albums for Shelter Records.

In 1972 Russell's "Shelter People" took to the road and a live performance was recorded and released as the Leon Live album in 1973. The year before, he released his third studio album Carney, which features 'Tight Rope' and the beautiful 'This Masquerade.' The latter ballad was recorded by numerous artists including Helen Reddy and the Carpenters; George Benson's version reached #10 on the Hot 100 and in 1977 won a Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

Russell released Hank Wilson's Back! (Vol. 1), recorded in Nashville in 1973; incongruously, he also helped the funk-soul outfit the Gap Band, based around the trio of Tulsa brothers who backed Leon on his Stop All That Jazz album. The following year, Will O' the Wisp became Russell's fourth gold album.

Leon formed his own label, Paradise Records, in 1976 and over the coming decades recorded a string of albums, but none achieved the prominence of his early recordings. Russell and Willie Nelson had a No.1 on the country music chart in 1979 with their duet of 'Heartbreak Hotel.' By the early 1980s, he was working as New Grass Revival and in 1984 released Hank Wilson Vol. II.

In 1991, Russell released Anything Can Happen on Virgin Records, produced by Bruce Hornsby, and the two of them worked closely together throughout the decade. Into the new millennium, Russell was still releasing records but it was in 2009 that a major new project came along when Elton John recorded an album with him produced by T-Bone Burnett and released the following year. Rolling Stone placed Union at No.3 on its list of the 30 best albums of 2010. In 2011 the Union film documentary was released; made by Cameron Crowe, it explored the creative process behind the record.

In 2014, Life Journey, made with producer Tommy LiPuma, was released, and the following year Russell joined Rita Coolidge, Claudia Lennear, Chris Stainton and other members of the 1970 Joe Cocker Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour for a tribute concert to Cocker organized by the Tedeschi Trucks Band.

Leon Russell was a major talent, releasing well over 30 albums during his career, and while he did get a lot of recognition during the first half of the 1970s, his star never did shine quite as brightly as it should have in the ensuing decades. Elton John and Bernie Taupin's love of his music brought him some belated recognition, but it is sad that an artist's passing is sometimes needed to bring him the kind of accolades reserved for others. Elton John called 'A Song For You' an American classic, and its words are worth remembering now…

I've been so many places in my life and time
I've sung a lot of songs
I've made some bad rhymes
I've acted out my life on stages
With 10, 000 people watching
But we're alone now and I'm singing this song to you…

Farewell to The Master Of Space And Time.

Follow the official Leon Russell Best Of playlist. 

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26 comments

  1. Jonathon
    Reply

    One of the best shows ever, he stole the show from headliners Ten Years After and one memorable performance by Procol Harum doing their HOME album. November, 1971. Spectrum/Philadelphia.

    Absolutely blew the place away. The place emptied after Procol…it was just too much.

  2. Peter Cassaro
    Reply

    One of my long time favorites, loved your music. Another great talent goes home to Rock and Roll Heaven. Rest easy my brother…

  3. Kristen Reker
    Reply

    Fly high and be free. Heaven is richer to have you there.
    May all the Leon Lifers keep you alive in their hearts forever.

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